Targets for Precision Shooting

For longer range practice the Flash Target is a great choice. It has a 10-inch target area and with larger caliber bullets hits can be seen without a spotter past 600 yards. The smaller calibers don’t move it much further out.

There are two plastic squares on the swivel bar; one is white and one florescent orange. The movement of the target is easily seen when the plastic squares move. The hanging gong swivels on a bar of stainless steel and has a zirk fitting to keep it lubricated. This target breaks down and will fit in a car trunk. It goes up in seconds.

Another great shorter range target is one of their poppers. These targets have 5 inch strike areas and reset themselves via spring action. Neither of these targets makes a gong sound when hit but there is a noticeable thwack. I have several different locations scouted that give me practice in different conditions.

Don’t forget to put up some flags to help dope the wind. It is good to have a spotter to help with the corrections. MGM makes such a variety of targets for the competitive shooter the best thing to do is check out their website. www.mgmtargets.com

There are a variety of other reactive targets that will give the precision marksman some good practice and some fun. Try golf balls, eggs, and balloons. The nice thing about balloons is you can make them different sizes. The challenging thing about them is when the wind is blowing windage isn’t the only problem.

 Companies like Just Shoot Me make plastic targets that are reactive and come in cubes, circles, and shapes like ground squirrels that can be placed on hillsides and engaged. They jump indicating a hit and can be shot again in a different location. They are extremely durable and allow the bullet to pass and then they close back up. A box of these will last a long time and give many hours of practice in one sitting.

 

These smaller targets are great for sighting in and recording groups.  I like the notebook style benchrest targets that are made out of a plastic-type paper. They are weather resistant and can be kept in a ring binder. The actual group is right there to compare with others along with the entire climate and load info.

These smaller targets are great for sighting in and recording groups. I like the notebook style benchrest targets that are made out of a plastic-type paper. They are weather resistant and can be kept in a ring binder. The actual group is right there to compare with others along with the entire climate and load info.

One of the most fun targets to engage at long range are exploding targets. They are small 2×2 square targets that can be bought in a kit and report when hit like an M-80. The active ingredient in these is a binary explosive material called tannerite. Binary means it is two inert chemicals that have to be mixed together to become active. They can only be set off by a high-power rifle bullet strike and are extremely stable even after mixed.

Exploding targets add a lot of fun to the marksman’s training but read all the directions and warnings before using and make sure it is being used within the legalities of your locale.

All my target missions are “leave no trace“. I pick up all brass, target debris, as much lead as I can find (it melts back down into cowboy bullets), even the 22 brass. The only thing left behind where I target practice is the depressions in the ground from bullet strikes.

Caldwell: (573) 445-9200
www.battenfeldtechnologies.com

Eberlestock: (877) 866-3047
www.eberlestock.com

Lenny Magill: (800) 942-8273
gunvideo.com

This article appeared in the February 14, 2011 issue of Gun Digest the Magazine. Click here to learn more.

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