What Ever Happened to Glock’s .45 GAP?

When Glock introduced the .45 GAP, you’d have had to wonder if it really thought through the whole “fat as a G22, but only holds 10 rounds” concept. It seems an odd choice, given the market and its competitors.

When Glock introduced the .45 GAP, you’d have had to wonder if it really thought through the whole “fat as a G22, but only holds 10 rounds” concept. It seems an odd choice, given the market and its competitors.

The Glock .45 GAP?

This one has had me scratching my head ever since I first saw it, back at the 2007 SHOT show. Basically, the round is an engineering double-down on the .40, as in make a .45 that is short enough to fit into a 9mm magazine tube. Alas, it is an engineering step too far.

Advantages? You have a .45-caliber bullet. In the first loadings, they were only 200 grains, but, with a little wizardry, the ballisticians were able to get a full 230-grain bullet stepping out at full .45 ACP velocities. Nice.

You’d think, being in a G17-sized pistol, that it would be harder to control than a .45 ACP in a G21. Not really. The large grip of the G21 introduces problems of its own, and the end result is that the G37 is actually more controllable.

Disadvantages? The extra bullet diameter cuts into magazine capacity. Where the G22 holds 15 rounds of .40 S&W, the G37 only holds 10 rounds of .45 GAP.

The brass is easily mistaken for .45 ACP, so reloaders at your gun club will hate you mightily for leaving your brass. Also, the .45 GAP absolutely cannot be accommodated with a slide of the same weight as a 9mm/.40, so Glock had to increase the slide width. That means your G37 has to have a G37-specific holster, though magazines are the same externally.

The lineup here is G37, G38, and G39. Of the three, the only one to consider is the G38. If you’re going to have the size of the G37, you might as well have the capacity of a G22, while the big bullets in the ultra-compact G39 will be an unpleasant recoil experience.

Editor’s Note: Do you have experience with the .45 GAP? Log in and leave a comment below.

This article is an excerpt from Glock Deconstructed.


Recommended Glock Resources:

Glock Deconstructed Glock Deconstructed

The Gun Digest Book of the Glock, 2nd Edition

Glock Disassembly & Reassembly DVD

Glock Disassembly/Assembly Instructions (PDF)

3 thoughts on “What Ever Happened to Glock’s .45 GAP?

  1. ScubaMaui

    My very first Glock was a 37. It was a good deal and I always wanted to try a Glock. I was amazed with the accuracy and ease of handling, and promptly decided that I must be a Glock-man. I have since purchased several other models of Glocks, and love them all. I have several other handguns, including 1911s, but the 37 is still the most accurate for me. I even started reloading to be sure that I always would have adequate supply of the 45 GAP, but have really never had a problem finding the ammo. I don’t carry the 37, I have a 27 that fits my hip well.

    1. Baja Jones

      ” The large grip of the G21 introduces problems of its own” I guess that depends on who is holding the gun. I am an average size man 6′ 195 lbs and I score consistently better with my G21 than with G22 or G17 both on initial presentation from the holster and follow up shots. Like Scuba Maui I carry a 1911 Kimber because of size but he just talked me in to it. I am headed out to purchase a G37.

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