Avoid 7 Common Mistakes of Wingshooting

The muzzle of the gun should be steered to the lead picture with minimal movement. This is best controlled by positioning the gun just under the armpit, with the muzzle elevation starting just under the line of the bird

The muzzle of the gun should be steered to the lead picture with minimal movement. This is best controlled by positioning the gun just under the armpit, with the muzzle elevation starting just under the line of the bird

Stopping the Gun

Certainly one of the major reasons a shooter misses could be traced to our rifle shooting heritage. Since most shooters learned to shoot by aiming a rifle or pistol, chances are they will occasionally find themselves unable to get the gun sufficiently through or ahead of the bird. When a shooter’s smoothness of swing is interrupted this way, he will invariably stop the gun. If the muzzle ever stops, even briefly, the timing of the shot will be affected and the possibilities of a miss are increased.

A shooter can minimize stopping the gun by heightening his concentration and focusing on the bird, being smooth with the gun swing and remembering to follow through after the shot is taken. By concentrating on these aspects of a successful shot, the shooter can assure himself a good chance every time he shoulders the gun.

Two ways to make certain that the guy doesn’t stop is to watch the bird fall through the beads of the gun or staying in the gun as if you were going to shoot at the bird again. While these two tips sound simple, if you can make them a part of every shot in the field your shooting success will increase significantly.

A great deal of the success or failure experienced by a shooter is determined by the confidence he has in seeing lead pictures. The more often a shooter sees a bird fall or a target break with a lead picture, the more confidence he will have the next time he sees a similar shot.

This article is an excerpt from the Gun Digest Book of Shotgunning. Click Here to get your copy

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