Tactical Military Arms

The Leatherwood ART M1000 Automatic Ranging and Trajectory Scope, Part 3

Here's what the Leatherwood ART M1000 scope reticle looks like with the center ranging bracket on an 18-inch high target. By zooming in to fit the paper in the bracket, the scope automatically adjusts for the range, which happened to be 400 meters.

Here’s what the Leatherwood ART M1000 scope reticle looks like with the center ranging bracket on an 18-inch high target. By zooming in to fit the paper in the bracket, the scope automatically adjusts for the range, which happened to be 400 meters.

Editor’s Note: In Part I of this series we looked at the history and concept of the Leatherwood Hi-Lux M1000 ART Scope. In Part II, we’ll discuss setting up and sighting in this unique optic. And in Part III we’ll head out to the big range to see how well it ranges and compensates for shots out to 550 meters.

Having discussed the history and set-up of the Leatherwood ART M1000 Automatic Ranging and Trajectory scope in Part 1 and Part 2 of this review, I took the optic out to a local 600-yard range to see if it really works.

As a review, the scope was mounted atop an Armalite AR-10 National Match, and the ammunition was Hornady’s 168 gr. Match Grade TAP in .308.

5-shot group at 400 meters using the Leatherwood ART M1000 scope. No math calculations, or clicks of the turret were needed. This was the first group shot at this range using the scope in auto ranging mode.

5-shot group at 400 meters using the Leatherwood ART M1000 scope. No math calculations, or clicks of the turret were needed. This was the first group shot at this range using the scope in auto ranging mode.

One thing to note about this scope is that everything is delineated in meters, not yards. I first established that the rifle was hitting dead center at a 250 meter zero, with the power ring down on 2.5. Even though I had followed the suggestions in the instructions to start with a 100-meter zero by using the top bracket subtend in the reticle, my shots were actually about 6 inches high at 250. No matter, with a quick adjustment, that was corrected and the target moved back.

Now, one of the advantages of the Leatherwood ART scope — why the optic was so effective for Army snipers fighting in Vietnam — is the fact that you don’t have to know the range.

You only need to bracket a target of known dimensions (say an 18-inch chest of a deer) by zooming in or out with the power ring. And then you shoot.

That being said, I wanted to test the scope’s cam and thus placed my target at 400 meters. I then zoomed in until my 18-inch white target fit in half of the reticle bracket (see photo).  Again, because this was a test, I then peeked at the power ring to verify. Sure enough, 4 power … and 400 meters — right on the money.

I took a five shot string and assessed the target — a nice dead center group. Certainly accurate enough to have resulted in a dead elk or mule deer.

This was exciting considering the range was 400 meters and not once did I have to think about bullet drop or anything having to do with MOA or MILs. NEXT PAGE

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