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Nickel brass cases are visually appealing, since the coating resists tarnishing after being handled.

The Nickel Brass Case, Reloading the Shiny Sibling

Nickel brass cases are the shining gems of ammunition, resistant to tarnishing, no matter whose sweaty hands have been on them. But to use the component for reloading takes some understanding of the material's characteristics.

Figuring out the greatest cartridges of all time has the benefit of having to test a ton of ammo.

Greatest Cartridges: A Debate with Plenty of Ammo

There are all sorts of cartridges, with all kinds of applications. But when the rubber hits the road, what makes a great cartridge? Well, dear readers, that is a complicated subject, but not one devoid of an answer.

Many tend to think the belt on belted magnums is to help the cartridges handle high pressure. In reality, the belt creates proper headspace in a rifle's chamber.

Belted Magnum Cases: A Myth Dispelled

The dominant feature of the belted magnum is, obviously, its belt. But, the unique facet of the cartridge's design does not function the way most believe it does.

Neck sizing is a snap, all that is required is a specialized neck-sizing die such as this one made by Redding.

Neck Sizing, A Bolt-Action Specialty

For those aiming to milk the most accuracy from their bolt-action rifles there is a reloading technique right up your ally – neck sizing. By only resizing the neck of the cartridge shooters can tighten up their groups in a jiff.

Classic expansion of a bonded core bullet, a 400-grain .416 Swift A-Frame recovered from a Cape Buffalo.

Bonded Core Beauties, Not Your Grandad’s Bullets

It's hard to deny the bonded core bullet has been a game changer when it comes to ammunition. Offering incredible penetration, expansion and ballistic performance, the bullets have become the go-to option for big game hunters.

40 Smith & Wesson ammo needs to be taper cripmed.

Cartridge Crimp Styles and Uses

Crimping a cartridge is the final step in producing ammunition and it must be done. But the type of crimp used to hold a bullet in place all depends on the type of ammo you're reloading.

A .458 (left) and a .500 Nitro Express (right), each tipped with a 500-grain round nose bullet.

Round Nose Bullets, Too Often Overlooked

Round nose bullets should definitely have a place on a reloader's bench. They are a superior close-range option, remaining as accurate as a spitzer, while delivering more energy on target.