Reloading

Reloading saves you money, allows more shooting and helps create rounds much more accurate than you’d buy off the shelf. Gun Digest’s reloading section gives you the pertinent data and resources to help you turn your reloading bench into a quality ammunition factory. Reloading DataPerformance Handloading Blog.45 ACP Reloading DownloadAckley Cartridges DownloadCartridge Basics Download

40 Smith & Wesson ammo needs to be taper cripmed.

Cartridge Crimp Styles and Uses

Crimping a cartridge is the final step in producing ammunition and it must be done. But the type of crimp used to hold a bullet in place all depends on the type of ammo you're reloading.

A .458 (left) and a .500 Nitro Express (right), each tipped with a 500-grain round nose bullet.

Round Nose Bullets, Too Often Overlooked

Round nose bullets should definitely have a place on a reloader's bench. They are a superior close-range option, remaining as accurate as a spitzer, while delivering more energy on target.

Save those reloading manuals!

Reloading Manuals the Sacred Tomes of Reloading

When it comes to ammunition, there is no more important source of knowledge than reloading manuals. With pertinent data on nearly every bullet, powder and caliber, new and old editions of these references help create the perfect load.

Stick powder on a scale.

Gunpowder or Things That Make You Go Boom!

Nowadays, reloaders have every type of propellent at their fingertips. But to get the most out of a cartridge, reloaders must understand the different powders' properties. Master ballistician Philip Massaro breaks down what you need to know about powder.

Primers-in-the-Primer-Tray

Primers, First Stage of Ignition

Primers are literally the spark that gets everything rolling in a cartridge. But there are some fine points about the component that must be understood to safely get the most out of the ammunition you're reloading.