3 New Steel Loads for Waterfowl

Best new steel shot loads for ducks.

For waterfowlers seeking the ultimate in hard-hitting steel shot, these 3 new high performance steel loads are hard to beat.

Remington Hypersonic

Remington reports that its 12-gauge HyperSonic loads have a muzzle velocity of 1,700 fps. The author’s tests actually revealed they fly a bit faster than that.

Remington reports that its 12-gauge HyperSonic loads have a muzzle velocity of 1,700 fps. The author’s tests actually revealed they fly a bit faster than that.

The initial problem with increasing the velocity of steel shot has been overcoming the shot charge’s inertia while not exceeding the shotshell’s relatively low pressure limit. Remington ammunition engineers determined if the acceleration resistance of the shot charge and wad could be overcome by gases from a small measure of powder, then once the shot was moving a second heavier amount of powder would substantially increase maximum velocity, while staying within pressure limits. After several attempts, the engineers tried an ignition chamber in the rear of a wad and called it the Xelerator.

“We actually drew the idea on a napkin,” said David Schluckebier, manager of new ammunition product development for Remington. When the primer ignites the powder in the ignition chamber, the powder gases start the wad and shot moving forward. The walls of the chamber are scored in three places so the wall ruptures and allows the flame to then ignite the main powder charge.
Remington states the HyperSonic ignition system fires various 10- and 20-gauge steel loads at 1,600 fps and 12-gauge loads at 1,700 fps. Velocities of 12-gauge loads I recorded were actually slightly faster. The 3-inch load of 1 1/4 oz. of No. 1s had a velocity of 1,789 fps five feet in front of the muzzle of a 28-inch barrel of a Benelli Nova pump. The 3½-inch load of 1 3/8 oz. of BBs had a velocity of 1,731 fps.

Remington loads round zinc-plated steel shot in its HyperSonic loads.

Remington loads round zinc-plated steel shot in its HyperSonic loads.

One drawback to launching relatively lightweight steel shot that fast is it flares more due to increased air resistance.

“We took that into consideration,” Schluckebier said, “and designed the shotcup on the Xelerator wad to tighten up patterns by keeping the shot charge together inside the cup a few feet past the muzzle before the shot is released into the air.” That is achieved with thin plastic that connects the shotcup’s four petals and delays them from flaring. When the petals do start to fan out, notches, called Wad Stress Concentrators, at the base of the shotcup increase petal spread to peal the wad away from the shot.

Patterns shot through the Nova with the 3-inch shells firing 1 1/4 oz. of No. 1s kept 74 percent of the pellets in a 30-inch pattern circle at 40 yards fired through full, modified and improved cylinder screw-in chokes. The 3 1/2-inch load of 13/8 oz. of BBs shot 75 percent of its pellets into a pattern circle through an improved cylinder choke, 64 percent shot through a modified choke and 62 percent through a full choke.

Federal Black Cloud

Federal’s High Velocity Black Cloud steel loads fire 1 1/8 oz. of shot at 1,635 fps.

Federal’s High Velocity Black Cloud steel loads fire 1 1/8 oz. of shot at 1,635 fps.

Federal’s Black Cloud FliteStopper (FS) steel shot and FliteControl wad give a new meaning to the term dead duck.

FS steel shot incorporates a belt around the pellets that acts as a cutting edge to enlarge wound channels in birds. The diameter of FS No. 2 steel pellets at their belt measure .17 of an inch in diameter, which is nearly the width of BB pellets. Most Black Cloud loads include 40 percent FS pellets and 60 percent regular steel pellets. Black Cloud Close Range loads contain all FS pellets.
These steel pellets are held in a FliteControl wad with six small petals at the base and three larger petals part way up the wad that open relatively slowly to start backing the wad away from the shot roughly 10 yards from the muzzle. That results in very tight patterns.

Federal’s High Velocity Black Cloud steel loads contain a mix of 40 percent FliteStopper (FS) pellets and 60 percent regular steel pellets. Federal’s Black Cloud Close Range loads contain 100 percent FS pellets.

Federal’s High Velocity Black Cloud steel loads contain a mix of 40 percent FliteStopper (FS) pellets and 60 percent regular steel pellets. Federal’s Black Cloud Close Range loads contain 100 percent FS pellets.

Before testing the loads on a pattern board, I wondered if the belt on the FS pellets would cause them to flare due to increased air resistance. My tests revealed that wasn’t the case. The FS pellets cut holes in the paper like the tip of a knife (compared to the round holes of the regular steel pellets), and most were within the pattern circle. Black Cloud 12-gauge, 3-inch loads of 1 1/4 oz. of No. 2s shot through full, modified and improved cylinder chokes in a Beretta Model 3901 printed 80 to 83 percent of the load’s pellets in a 30-inch circle at 40 yards.

The velocity of Black Cloud loads is pretty fast, too. Ten-gauge loads of 1 5/8 oz. of shot have a velocity of 1,375 fps, 12-gauge 3.5-inch loads of 1 1/2 oz. of shot 1,500 fps and 3-inch 1 1/4 oz. a velocity of 1,450 fps. High Velocity 12-gauge 3-inch loads fire 1 1/8 oz. of shot at 1,635 fps.

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