The Best Handgun: A Beginner’s Guide to Handguns

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Choosing the best handgun is not a choice you can take lightly. Your lifestyle will dictate what self defense handgun or concealed carry handgun will work for you, but you also need to be willing to make adjustments to the handgun, in some cases. The best handguns for women may not be the right choice for a man, and vice versa. This download looks at different types of handguns, handgun size, semi-autos versus revolvers for concealed carry, and more. In this FREE DOWNLOAD you’ll learn:

• The best brands of concealed carry handguns
• All about small semi-autos
• If the snub-nose revolver is right for you
• Open sights versus lights and lasers on handguns
• Basic handgun shooting techniques

Don’t go shopping for new handguns until you’ve downloaded this FREE primer!


What’s The Best Handgun Size?

Guns can be too small for concealed carry use, and guns can also be too large to hide. Generally speaking, you should be able to get at least one to one and one-half fingers on the butt of the gun for a secure hold. If you cannot grasp the gun easily as it is drawn, you are increasing your chances of a fumble when the gun is needed. With almost any handgun you might conceivably carry concealed, two fingers is enough for a terrific hold, the little finger curled under. If you specifically have a gun for concealed carry, you must understand some basic parameters.

With a little modification, such as larger or extended grips, your concealed carry handgun may be capable of pinpoint target accuracy. So what? That’s nice and all, but you don’t need to be able to shoot a one-hole group at twenty-five yards. If you can, fine; but, if that means making the weapon less concealable, you may be hitting the bullseye but you’re missing the point. That’s why we don’t put handgun scopes on hideout weapons.

Walther — very sensibly, I might add — would supply their PP series pistols with two magazines, one of which had the finger rest extension, the other without. Sensible people who carried concealed used the finger rest extension magazine as a spare or when plinking or target shooting, using the magazine without the finger rest extension when the gun was hidden on body.

Consider the Logic: What’s the Best Handgun for You?

Let’s say that the use of a finger rest extension lengthens the gripping surface by more or less a half an inch. If you buy a handgun with a grip that is a half-inch or so longer, you might very well have one round greater capacity in the magazine.

So, if you’re going to lengthen the grip and possibly reduce concealability, you may as well get that extra round for your trouble. The idea with a concealable handgun is that it should be concealable.

Within reason, length of a handgun matters little to nothing as far as concealment is concerned, depending on application and carry method. When I do live demonstrations of concealment positions at waist level, I use a six inch N-Frame, if one’s available.

The revolver is easy for folks in the back row to see and, if you do it right, a six-inch N-Frame can be concealed perfectly well, although a gun of that length is far from ideal for the task. Grip length, on the other hand, is extremely important. Too long a grip and the handgun will be harder to hide, poking out under the covering garment. Too long a grip as relates to too little length and the gun butt will “fall away” from the body when worn at waist level. This further complicates hiding the gun.


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