Gun Review: Browning 725

The 725’s steel receiver has a silver nitride finish and high-relief engraving. A duck adorns the right side of the field model, and a pheasant appears on the left. The receiver is narrower than older models, thanks to a smaller diameter full-length hinge pin.

The 725’s steel receiver has a silver nitride finish and high-relief engraving. A duck adorns the right side of the field model, and a pheasant appears on the left. The receiver is narrower than older models, thanks to a smaller diameter full-length hinge pin.

As it is with its predecessors, the 725’s receiver is steel and not aluminum. The overall weight of my test gun with 28-inch barrels was 71/3 pounds.

The fore-end appears to be a hybridization of the style found on the company’s classic Lightning, and the schnabel style preferred by the sport shooting crowd. Regardless, the hands falls naturally in place and the grip is secure.

The toplever shape, like the action, has a lower profile. The safety is still located on the tang and it still incorporates a barrel selector.

The toplever shape, like the action, has a lower profile. The safety is still located on the tang and it still incorporates a barrel selector.

The Inflex recoil pad is the same version found on other Browning guns like the Maxus and does a fine job minimizing recoil.

When the 725 Citori that I was to test for this article arrived, I pieced it together and was immediately impressed by its sleek lines and obvious build quality.

The changes aren’t radical, but I will say that I believe that those in action contour were indeed needed and well executed on the new gun.

Even a 3/16-inch reduction in action depth brings the shooter’s hands noticeably closer to the center of the gun, and the overall feel and handling of the 725 is better than with previous models. It isn’t enough of a change to send purists into fits of rage, but it is effective and noticeable.

Browning guns are favorites in competitive skeet and sporting clays circles, and I believe the new 725 won’t miss a step in the competition world; though the version I tested was a field gun, the DNA is there for a quality competition gun.

The balance point is just ahead of the receiver, meaning the weight is evenly distributed between the hands.

The field gun wears white front and mid-beads and includes the company’s new Invector DS thin-walled choke tubes, which are designed to seal out gases and residue that gum up other tubes and make them difficult to remove after excessive shooting.

The 725 seemed to pattern consistently, which helps the shooter break more clays and drop more birds.

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