Testfire: Ruger SR40 Review

The SR40 has an accessory rail for the attachment of things such as lights, lasers or even this pistol bayonet from LaserLyte.

The SR40 has an accessory rail for the attachment of things such as lights, lasers or even this pistol bayonet from LaserLyte.

The Ruger SR40 is a striker-fired handgun that offers a host of unique features, exceptional reliability, great ergonomics, and excellent accuracy. It is also modestly priced, with an MSRP of only $525.

The SR40 is a comfortably sized pistol that comes with two 15-round magazines and a handy loading tool.

The SR40 is a comfortably sized pistol that comes with two 15-round magazines and a handy loading tool.

Recently, the SR40 and SR40c were introduced in the super-popular .40 Smith & Wesson cartridge. This makes a lot of sense, since many justifiably think any defensive caliber ought to begin with a “4.”

Both frame sizes have their place, depending on the intended use. The compact models shave about .64-inch off the barrel and 3.1 ounces off the weight of the standard models. This is not to say the standard models are big. They’re not, but they are a bit larger than the compacts. All four versions have a coordinated set of synergetic features that produce a comfortable, efficient, and reliable shooting system.

The Ruger SR40 is striker-fired and offers a host of unique features, exceptional reliability, great ergonomics, and excellent accuracy. (I might mention that it is also modestly priced, with an MSRP of only $525.)

It features a glass-filled nylon grip frame. The pistol fits my hand like a glove, and—praise be—its angle is exactly the same as a 1911, important to those of us trained on the old .45. When I raise the SR40 to shooting position, the sights are pointed right at the target.

The trigger has a trigger safety lever that prevents firing unless the trigger is completely pulled. An ambidextrous manual safety is also provided at the rear of the slide, which not only prevents firing, but also locks the slide.

Its use is not required because, like most other DAO pistols, the gun is completely safe until the shooter picks it up and pulls the trigger. A flat loaded-chamber indicator, another safety feature, is on the top of the slide at the rear of the ejection port and sticks up when a round is loaded in the chamber.

The trigger pull on my test-fire sample was seven pounds, one ounce. It was a bit gritty at first, but, after a few break-in rounds, it smoothed right up. To me, it felt like a highly tuned revolver—just as a DAO pistol is supposed to—first shot to last. Additionally, the SR40 uses a unique link-less system to lock and unlock the barrel that differs from those pistols in the Ruger P-series. Movement of the slide fore and aft is slick and quick.

Combined with a grip frame that is extremely strong, lightweight, and very pleasing to the hand, felt recoil seems moderated. I also liked that the molded-in checkering on the grips, backstrap, and front of the grip, which provide a good handhold without sandpapering off your skin when firing.

One thought on “Testfire: Ruger SR40 Review

  1. flashback

    You have nicely echoed my sentiments about the SR40 which I have owned for going on four years now. With upwards of 9000 rds through my all black SR40 (dubbed Darth Ruger) at various IDPA matches and numerous defensive pistol classes it has never let me down. I highly recommend the Ruger SR line to others.

COMMENT