Tactical Military Arms

The Colt New Agent: All Business For Concealed Carry

The Colt New Agent at SHOT Show 2012. Photo by Corey Graff

The Colt New Agent at SHOT Show 2012. Photo by Corey Graff

After several days of wandering about the SHOT Show, one begins to get the “2,000-yard stare.” People afflicted by this sorry condition cast a hollow gaze out upon the show floor. Usually the stupor is harmless enough, but occasionally the more serious cases require the patient to be carted off in a white straight jacket. Just about anything can trigger it, but the most common culprit is processing too much data on guns sporting everything but the kitchen sink. And I believe some next year will very likely feature kitchen sinks.

The Colt New Agent Model 07810D, with traditional-style finish and grips.

The Colt New Agent Model 07810D, with traditional-style finish and grips.

It was amidst this backdrop that the Colt New Agent — with its subtle, all-business trench-style sights — stood out from the crowd and jolted me back to reality.

This is a seemingly quaint little handgun that isn’t trying to please everybody or fit into a multitude of shooting disciplines: It’s got one identity and that’s as a so-close-and-there’s-no-time-I-must-shoot-right-now gun. In other words, this gun is all business.

While I’m sure the trench-style sights (essentially a full-length groove running along the top of the slide) will get the job done under 7 yards, the model I saw (07812DCT), in all black, was outfitted with a Crimson Trace laser grip. I have to admit that I was surprisingly attracted to the looks of this pistol. And its lack of obtrusive sights on top is obviously conducive to a snag-free draw from deep concealment.

Actually, according to the Standard Catalog of Firearms, the Colt New Agent was first introduced in 2007. That source lists it as having “fixed” sights and a series 80 action.

Of course, the New Agent’s namesake is derived from the Colt Agent — its revolver counterpart from the ’50s era. The Standard Catalog of Colt lists the Colt Agent revolver as being introduced in 1955 and produced through 1973 as the Colt Agent 1st Issue. A slightly more streamlined version, the Colt Agent 2nd Issue, was manufactured from 1973 to 1986.

Both sixguns were essentially identical to 1st Issue Colt Cobra six-shooters, but with shortened grip frames for easier concealment.

The Colt New Agent carries this torch only in a semi-automatic format.

The Colt New Agent with Crimson Laser grips.Now, if you’re like me and find the all black finish and laser treatment of the 07812DCT Model not quite to your stylistic liking, you might check out the Model 07810D Colt New Agent. It has a more traditional style grip and finish.

Both pistols feature an enhanced hammer, 1918 style safety lock, standard grip safety and 3-hole aluminum trigger. A lowered and flared ejection port is common to both, and Colt claims this feature enhances reliability and accuracy.

The models 07812DCT, 07810D and 07812D are all single-action hammer guns that come in either .45 ACP or 9mm. There is a double-action only model, hammerless, designated the 07810DA. It is .45 ACP only.

The Colt New Agents sport 3-inch stainless steel bushingless barrels. The .45 ACP offerings are 7-shot; the 9mm Parabellum is an 8-round gun. The MSRP, depending upon model, runs from $995-$1263.

In my opinion, the Colt New Agent is ideal as a secondary backup gun for concealed carry.

And believe me when I say: if this little pistol can cure the SHOT Show Stare, it can do just about anything.

Learn more at colt.com


Recommended 1911 Resources

1911: The First 100 Years

Massad Ayoob’s Greatest Handguns of the World

1911 Series Disassembly-Reassembly DVD

Gun Digest 2011

 

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