the technical rifleman

Dry fire gun drills

Is It Possible to Overdo Gun Drills?

    Practice. It’s the way to get good at just about anything. Gun drills can even help you get good at doing the wrong thing. Lones Wigger, the most decorated Olympic rifleman ever, once told me he practiced gun drills up to four hours a day for the U.S. Army Marksmanship Training Unit....

Harris Bipod for Rifles

How to Use Rifle Bipods, Tripods

    The animals you hunt live amid an abundance of rock, trees, hillocks and other rifle rests. Alas, there’s never a rock or a limb where you need it, when you have little time to fire. That’s why Cro Magnon man invented a rest for his spear…Well, perhaps the bipod doesn’t go that...

Target shooting improves marksmanship

The Evolution of Marksmanship

  One shot does not a marksman make. Neither does it demonstrate accuracy. A single hole, in an animal or a paper target, shows only that you fired the rifle. It takes more to achieve true marksmanship. During the iron-sight stage of a smallbore match years ago, I settled into prone and accidentally brushed...

Headspace gauges

Headspace 101: What Happens Inside Your Rifle’s Chamber

  Headspace is one of the most critical measures in your rifle. A quick definition: the distance from the face of the locked bolt to a datum line or shoulder in the chamber that arrests the forward movement of the cartridge. The term originated when all cartridges had protruding rims, so the measure was...

1/4-minute clicks on scope

Wayne van Zwoll Explains: Minute of Angle and Milliradian (Mil)

Though shooters carry the terms as common coin, not everyone can define “minute of angle” and “mil” (milliradian). Minute of Angle A minute of angle, usually used as a measure of group size or shot dispersion, spans 1.047 inch at 100 yards. Call it an inch. But as it is an angular measurement, its...

Bullet trajectory

Wayne van Zwoll: Why Bullet Trajectory Doesn’t Go Straight

Bullets travel in arcs. You knew that. Actually, they’re parabolic arcs. A bullet drops faster as it goes farther. Well, not really. Gravity determines how fast a bullet drops, and its force doesn’t change over the course of a bullet’s flight. But the arc does get steeper at distance. Why? Gravity’s Effect on Bullet...

Sidelock by Holland & Holland

Wayne van Zwoll: Thinking Inside The Boxlock

About the time George Armstrong Custer made ready to round up wayward Sioux on the flanks of the Little Bighorn, a couple of gunmakers working at Westley Richards of Birmingham, England fashioned a new rifle mechanism. Like the dropping-block rifle John Moses Browning would build just a few years later (marketed by Winchester as...